3/01/2015

Homily: 2nd Sunday of Lent

FR. MARK'S HOMILY  2nd Sunday of Lent


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Recorded Sunday, February 22, 2015 at Christ the Redeemer Catholic Church in Thibodaux, Louisiana. © Fr. Mark Toups, 2015

2/22/2015

Homily: 1st Sunday of Lent

MASS READINGS  Sunday, February 22
•  All the readings together
•  Genesis 9:8-15
•  Psalm 25:4-5, 6-7, 8-9
•  1st Peter 3:18-22
•  Mark 1:12-15

FR. MARK'S HOMILY  1st Sunday of Lent


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HISTORY SERIES > Week 1
We don't determine how we worship God, God determines how we worship Him

No. 1 > In today’s first reading: God establishes the covenant with Noah
God said to Noah and to his sons with him:
“See, I am establishing my covenant with you and your descendants after you
and with every living creature that was with you:
I will establish my covenant with you, that never again shall all bodily creatures be destroyed by the waters of a flood.
— Genesis 9:8-15 (First reading today, first Sunday of Lent, year B)
No. 2 > What is a covenant?
  • Sacred family bond between persons
  • Usually sealed by an oath and/or sacrifice

No. 3 > What does it mean?
  • Bond: The covenant is a bond. It unites the parties involved in some way. Usually in a permanent (or quasi-permanent) fashion.
  • Family: The covenant is a family bond.  The bond created is not only legal or economic. Rather, it establishes the parties involved as kin
  • Sacred: The covenant is a “sacred” family bond, because it involves God. Sealed with an oath, invoking the divine name or power of God. Sealed with sacrifice: blood sacrifice or burnt offering

No. 4 > Covenant or contract?
  • Contract: Not necessarily sacred; it involves promises rather than oaths
  • Contract: Not necessarily familial; exchange of goods rather than of persons
  • Contract: Not necessarily permanent; temporary relations can be broken

No. 5 > Covenants in the Old Testament
  • Covenant with Adam and Eve: covenant with a couple; sign of the covenant was the Sabbath
  • Covenant with Noah: covenant with a family; sign of the covenant was the rainbow
  • Covenant with Abraham: covenant with a tribe; sign of the covenant was circumcision
  • Covenant with Moses: covenant with a nation; sign of the covenant was the Ten Commandments 
  • Covenant with David: covenant with a kingdom; sign of the covenant was the throne and Temple (built by Solomon)

No. 6 > God speaks to a people, not just a person
While Israel was encamped there in front of the mountain, Moses went up to the mountain of God. Then the Lord called to him from the mountain, saying: ... Now, if you obey me completely and keep my covenant, you will be my treasured possession among all peoples, though all the earth is mine. You will be to me a kingdom of priests, a holy nation. That is what you must tell the Israelites. ... Go to the people and have them sanctify themselves today and tomorrow ... for on the third day the Lord will come down on Mount Sinai in the sight of all the people. ... Then Moses came down from the mountain [and] said, “Be ready for the third day.”
— Exodus 19:2b, 3a, 5-6, 10-11,14-15
No. 7 > Moses’ first trip: God teaches his people how to live
  • Exodus 20:1-17 > The 10 commandments
  • Exodus 21 > How to live
  • Exodus 22 > How to live
  • Exodus 23 > How to live
When Moses came to the people and related all the words of the Lord, they all answered with one voice, “We will do everything
that the Lord has told us.”
— Exodus 24:3
No. 8 > Now that I’ve taught you how to live ... let me teach you how to worship
  • Exodus 25 > The Ark of the Covenant, items for the “meeting tent”
  • Exodus 26 > Items for the “meeting tent”
  • Exodus 27 > Items for the “meeting tent”
  • Exodus 28 > The priesthood, the vestments
  • Exodus 29 > The priesthood and sacrifice
  • Exodus 30 > Items for worship
  • Exodus 31 > Sabbath laws

No. 9 > Wonder what the others are up to
When the people saw that Moses was delayed in coming down from the mountain, they gathered around Aaron and said to him, “Come, make us a god who will go before us; as for that man Moses who brought us out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has
happened to him.” Aaron replied, “Take off the golden earrings
that your wives, your sons, and your daughters are wearing, and bring them to me.” So all the people took off their earrings and brought them to Aaron. He received their offering, and fashioning it with a tool, made a molten calf. Then they cried out, “These are your gods, Israel, who brought you up from the land of Egypt.” Early the next day the people sacrificed burnt offerings and brought communion sacrifices. Then they sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to revel.”
— Exodus 32:1-6
No. 10 > What do we learn from the story? from our history?
  • God is the one who determines how we worship Him, not us. 
  • We don’t determine how we worship God, God does.

Recorded Sunday, February 22, 2015 at Christ the Redeemer Catholic Church in Thibodaux, Louisiana. © Fr. Mark Toups, 2015

2/18/2015

Ash Wednesday

ASH WEDNESDAY SCHEDULE
Christ the Redeemer Catholic Church
720 Talbot Avenue, Thibodaux, LA

6:00 - 7:00 am > Men's Bible Studay
7:00 - 7:30 am > Confessions
7:30 - 8:15 am > Daily Mass and Ashes
8:15 - 12:05 pm > Confessions
12:05 - 12:45 pm > Daily Mass and Ashes
12:45 - 5:30 pm > Confessions
5:30 - 6:15 pm > Daily Mass and Ashes
6:15 - 7:00 pm > Confessions

TODAY'S MASS READINGS
•  All the readings together
•  Joel 2:12-18
 Psalm 51
•  2nd Corinthians 5:20—6:2
•  Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18

HOMILY ASH WEDNESDAY


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LENT ASH WEDNESDAY


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1/11/2015

Karoline Theriot: Rocking on Prayer!


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What's the Next Step l Part 1 l 01.11.15

MASS READINGS  Sunday, January 11
•  All the readings together
•  Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7
•  Psalm 29:1-2, 3-4, 3, 9-10
•  Acts 10:34-38
•  Mark 1:7-11

FR. MARK'S HOMILY  Baptism of the Lord


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ONE THING > Focus on one thing

1:  My relationship with God
>   Is this the year ... to learn how to pray?
>   Is this the year ... to make time to pray?
>   Is this the year ... to learn how to let Him lead my life?

2:  My understanding of the Faith
>   Is this the year ... to learn why I believe what I believe?
>   Is this the year ... to learn why the Church say this or does that?
>   Is this the year ... to learn who Jesus is?

3:  Connecting with others like me
>   Is this the year ... to join a men's group? women's group?
>   Is this the year ... to join a couple's group?
>   Is this the year ... to start a group?

4:  Ministry or service
>   Is this the year ... to help one person get to know God?
>   Is this the year ... to mentor someone who's ready to go deeper?
>   Is this the year ... to get more involved at the church?
>   Is this the year ... to help the poor and needy?

5:  My relationship with the Church
>   Is this the year ... to get my annulment?
>   Is this the year ... to get my marriage blessed?
>   Is this the year ... to finally go to Confession?
>   Is this the year ... to "become" Catholic?

Recorded Sunday, January 11, 2015 at Christ the Redeemer Catholic Church in Thibodaux, Louisiana. © Fr. Mark Toups, 2015

1/10/2015

New Homily Series Starts This Weekend!

WHAT'S THE NEXT STEP  HOMILY SERIES

Where do you want to be this time next year?
> in life?
> in your marriage?
> with you kids?
> towards your future?
> with God?

Many of us think about more, lots of us think about taking the next step ... but how do you take that first step?

Let's journey together ... help is on the way ...

This weekend > January 11 > Step 1:
Desire
> What do you want from God in 2015?

January 18: Step 2:
Interior Freedom
> Learning from the soccer goalie

January 25: Step 3:
Discernment is a process
How do I do it?

February 1: Step 4:
Making a decision
Choosing what’s available versus choosing what’s most natural

February 8:  Step 5:
Commitment
Our desire connected to the rest of reality

Nativity: Reflection 17: January 10

ATTUNED

“As soon as Joseph and Mary finish presenting Jesus to the Lord,
they meet a man named Simeon.
 This man was righteous and devout, awaiting the consolation of Israel,
and the holy Spirit was upon him” (Luke 2:25)

As soon as Joseph and Mary finish presenting Jesus to the Lord they meet a man named Simeon. “This man was righteous and devout, awaiting the consolation of Israel, and the holy Spirit was upon him. It had been revealed to him by the holy Spirit that he should not see death before he had seen the Messiah of the Lord. He came in the Spirit into the temple; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus to perform the custom of the law in regard to him, he took him into his arms and blessed God, saying: Now, Master, you may let your servant go in peace, according to your word, for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you prepared in sight of all the peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and glory for your people Israel.’ The child’s father and mother were amazed at what was said about him.” (Luke 2:25b-33)

Pope Benedict helps us get to know Simeon. “The old man Simeon and the prophetess Anna, prompted by the Spirit of God, appear in the Temple, and as representatives of faithful Israel they greet the ‘Lord’s Christ’ (2: 26). Three things are said to us regarding Simeon: he is righteous (just), he is devout, and he is looking for the consolation of Israel. … Simeon is ‘devout’— his whole person is oriented toward God. He is inwardly close to the Temple, he lives the encounter with God and awaits the ‘consolation of Israel.’ He lives for the Redeemer, for the one who is to come. … Simeon is a man of hope and expectation, and in this sense he already has the Holy Spirit upon him. We could say that he is a spiritual man and is therefore attuned to God’s call, to his presence. So on this occasion he speaks as a prophet. First he takes the child Jesus into his arms and praises God”. [38]

Simeon lives “attuned to God’s call, to his presence”. In fact, the common element of those in the Christmas story is that they lived “attuned to God’s call, to his presence”. Mary and Joseph lived attuned to God’s presence. The shepherds and the Magi lived attuned to God’s presence. Simeon and Anna lived attuned to God’s presence. They heard the voice of God; they felt the presence of God; they were led by the initiative of God.

I would imagine that many of us would love to live attuned to God’s presence. Imagine what work or going to meetings would look like if we were attuned to God’s presence. Imagine what marriage or celibacy would look like if we were attuned to God’s presence. Imagine what paying bills or raising kids or sitting in traffic would look like if we were attuned to God’s presence. Imagine what the ordinary things of life would look like if we were attuned to God’s presence. Now, there may be a little quiet lie whispered that sounds like, “I’m not that holy” or “ I’m not a saint” or “I could never live that close to God”. Trust me: that’s not God’s voice. He desires us. He wants us to live attuned to Him so much that He became man and entered the human experience.

Merry Christmas. The gift that God wants to give us today is His presence. He’s already there: in the ordinary, in the mundane, in the everyday. He’s there; He’s with you; He’s within. No matter what you face today, God is with you. He’s speaking; He’s leading; He’s reaching out to you. Let’s turn off the iPhones, the iPods, and the iPads. Let’s turn off the radio, the TV, and the internet. Today, let’s live quieter so that regardless of what life looks like on the outside we can be attuned to the presence of God on the inside.

FOR YOUR PRAYER

The Psalms are the sacred music of a chosen people written as songs to praise God. Imagine how often Simeon would have sung the Psalms as he prayed in the Temple. Begin by slowly reading Psalm 85:9-14 and Psalm 143:6-12. Now, prayerfully imagine the scene in Luke 2:25. Be in the scene. Be with Mary and Joseph. Be with Simeon. Notice their freedom. Notice how they live within. Notice how they lived attuned.

TODAY'S PRAYER“Jesus, I want a relationship with you. Teach me how to be in relationship with you and how to stay in relationship with you. Teach me how to live attuned to your presence.”

[38] Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives, pg. 83-84

© Fr. Mark Toups, 2012. Expressed written permission required for duplication.

Nativity: Conclusion

WITH

“Simeon blessed them and said to Mary his mother,
‘Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel,
and to be a sign that will be contradicted
(and you yourself a sword will pierce)
so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.” (Luke 2:34-35)

“Simeon blessed them and said to Mary his mother, ‘Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted (and you yourself a sword will pierce) so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.” (Luke 2:34-35) Pope Benedict writes “Having given praise to God with the child in his arms, Simeon turns to Mary with a prophetic saying. After the joyful words spoken over the child, what he tells her is a kind of Passion prophecy (cf. Luke 2: 34f.). Jesus is ‘set for the fall and rising of many in Israel,’ for a sign of contradiction. Simeon concludes with a very personal prophecy to the child’s mother: ‘a sword will pierce through your own soul.’ … Simeon’s Passion prophecy becomes quite specific— in the words spoken directly to Mary: ‘a sword will pierce through your own soul’ (Luke 2: 35). … The contradiction against the Son is also directed against the mother and it cuts her to the heart. For her, the Cross of radical contradiction becomes the sword that pierces through her soul. From Mary we can learn what true com-passion is: quite unsentimentally assuming the sufferings of others as one’s own. In the writings of the Church Fathers, a lack of feeling— insensitivity toward the suffering of others— is considered typical of paganism. In contrast to this attitude, the Christian faith holds up the God who suffers with men, and thereby draws us into his com-passion.” [39]

During the pilgrimage of Theotokos and Nativity we have come to know Mary. As a wife, she loved Joseph. She cherished Joseph’s laughter, relished his virtue, and rested in his masculine holiness. As a mother, she loved her son. She laughed with Jesus. She prayed with Jesus. She lived with Jesus. God was the center of Mary’s life; Jesus was the center of Mary’s life. She lived within. She lived attuned to the movement of God. She was led by God and lived in communion. With her total focus on the things of God, she sought her security from God alone. 

Mary lived with God. Therefore, it shouldn’t surprise us that when her son suffers Mary suffers. She lived in communion with him; therefore, will suffer in communion with him.

Merry Christmas: God is with you. His name is Emmanuel: God is with us. With the Incarnation, God chooses to enter the human condition, for God wants to be with us. God wants to be with us, especially when the December decorations are picked up and our homes look like they do January through November. God wants to be with us, especially when we return to the ordinary and life “feels” more mundane. And, God wants to be with us, especially when we suffer. The “Christian faith holds up the God who suffers with men, and thereby draws us into his com-passion.” Suffering is a part of life. It is dismissed by our culture, yet pervades the life of everyone in it. Few of us embrace it, yet all of us face it. Yes, suffering is a part of life. There is a lie whispered deep inside suffering that sounds something like, “I’m alone.” Thus, many of us run from suffering because we fear abandonment more than we fear suffering—none of us want to face suffering alone. Well, Merry Christmas: you’re not alone; God is with you.

When Jesus was grilled by the Scribes and Pharisees, Mary suffered with him. When Jesus was mocked by the Sanhedrin, Mary suffered with him. When Jesus was scourged and crucified, Mary suffered with him. Mary knows that life with Jesus isn’t always easy. Mary knows that life in general isn’t always easy. However, when Mary suffered with her son, her son with her. She was never alone. You are never alone. God is with you.

FOR YOUR PRAYER

The Psalms are the sacred music of a chosen people written as songs to praise God. Imagine how often Mary would have sung the Psalm 46. Begin by slowly reading Psalm 46. Read it a few times. Now, prayerfully imagine the scene in Luke 2:34-35. Be in the scene. Be with Mary. Be with Simeon. What’s in her heart as Simeon predicts her pain? What’s in your heart as Simeon predicts her pain? Where are you suffering? Where do you need to know that God is with you?

TODAY'S PRAYER“Jesus, I want a relationship with you. Teach me how to be in relationship with you and how to stay in relationship with you. Teach me how to endure suffering with you.”

[38] Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives, pg. 85-86

© Fr. Mark Toups, 2012. Expressed written permission required for duplication.

1/09/2015

Nativity: Reflection 16: January 9

FREE

“they took him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord,
just as it is written in the law of the Lord,
‘Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord’”
(Luke 2:22-23)

Joseph and Mary traveled to Jerusalem to “offer the sacrifice” called forth in the Book of Leviticus. Their pilgrimage to the great Temple will also require them “to present him to the Lord, just as it is written in the law of the Lord, ‘Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord’”. (Luke 2:22-23) The event in the Temple “begins by specifically quoting the law regarding the consecration of the first-born: ‘Every male that opens the womb shall be called holy to the Lord’ (2: 23; cf. Exodus 13: 2; 13: 12f., 15).” Jesus “was personally handed over to God in the Temple, given over completely to God. The verb parist├ínai, here translated as ‘to present,’ also means ‘to offer,’ in the way that sacrifices in the Temple were ‘offered.’ The language of sacrificial offering and priesthood is evoked here. Luke has nothing to say regarding the act of ‘redemption’ prescribed by the law. In its place we find the exact opposite: the child is handed over to God, and from now on belongs to him completely.” [34]

When Joseph and Mary present Jesus in the Temple it is more than a mere liturgical ritual. The Holy Father told us Jesus “was personally handed over to God in the Temple, given over completely to God.” He said, Jesus “from now on belongs to him completely.” Joseph and Mary offer back to God the gift that was entrusted to them. In doing so they acknowledge that Jesus belongs to the Father. They will care for Jesus. They will love him. They will raise him in Nazareth. However, they will do so knowing that he belongs to the Father. Imagine the interior freedom Mary must have had to so. The child is conceived in her womb. She bonds intimately with him for nine months as her body nourishes his growth. Immediately following his birth she holds him on her chest as only a mother can. Yet, in the Temple she consecrates him to the Father and her son “from now on belongs to him completely.” Imagine the interior freedom Mary must have had to surrender her son.

Mary knew freedom, real freedom. Pope Benedict XVI prays: “Let us carry in us Mary’s same sentiments of praise and thanksgiving to the Lord, her faith and her hope, her docile abandonment into the hands of divine providence.” [35] Mary’s freedom is seen in her “docile abandonment into the hands of” God. The Holy Father continues: “This is true freedom: actually to be able to follow our desire for good, for true joy, for communion with God and to be free from the oppression of circumstances that pull us in other directions.” [36] “Authentic freedom is not an opting out. It is an opting in; nothing less than letting go of self and allowing oneself to be drawn into Christ's very being for others.” [37]

Real freedom is “docile abandonment”. Real freedom is “an opting in”. Real freedom is “communion with God”. The world we live in defines freedom as the option to do whatever you want. However, real freedom is being able to rest in what you really want: peace, joy, rest … God. Mary shows us this in the Temple. She shows us real freedom comes from about abandoning ourselves into God. Therefore, why would we discuss “center” or “led” or “rescue” or “security” during this Christmas journey? We pray into these issues so that we can be free, really free.

What would your life look like if you were free? What would your life look like if you were free from fear? What would your life look like if you were free from anxiety? What would your life look like if you were free from pressure and stress? Is that possible? Can you be really free? You already have the “freedom” to do “whatever you want”. Does that really bring you freedom? Does the world and its “freedom” really make you happy?

Merry Christmas. Mary reminds us all what real freedom looks like and where freedom comes from. Christ brings freedom. Christmas brings freedom. Freedom comes when we surrender our lives to a person: Jesus. Freedom comes when we are led by a person: Jesus. Freedom comes when we live in communion with a person: Jesus. Merry Christmas. Christ wants to give you freedom. Do you want to be free? What do you want? What do you really want?

FOR YOUR PRAYER

The Psalms are the sacred music of a chosen people. The Psalms were written as songs to praise God.
Imagine how Mary and Joseph would have sung the Psalms as they prayed in the Temple. Begin by slowly reading Psalm 107. Now, prayerfully imagine the scene in Luke 2:22-23. Be in the scene. Be with Mary. Be with her as she enters the great Temple. Be with her as she gives her son to the priest in the Temple. Notice her freedom. Ask her today how you can be free.

TODAY'S PRAYER“Jesus, I want a relationship with you. Teach me how to be in relationship with you and how to stay in relationship with you. Teach what I need to be free from so that I can be free to stay in relationship with you.”

[34] Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives, pg. 82
[35] Pope Benedict XVI, Address, Marking the Conclusion of May, St. Peter's Square, June 2, 2008
[36] Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, St. Peter's Square, May 16, 2012
[37] Pope Benedict XVI, Pope Benedict in America: The Full Texts of Papal Talks Given During His Apostolic Visit to the United States, pg. 129

© Fr. Mark Toups, 2012. Expressed written permission required for duplication.

1/08/2015

Nativity: Reflection 15: January 8

SECURITY

“When the days were completed for their purification
according to the law of Moses,
they took him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord,
just as it is written in the law of the Lord,
‘Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord,’
and to offer the sacrifice of ‘a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons,’
in accordance with the dictate in the law of the Lord”
(Luke 2:22-24)

“In the Book of Leviticus it is laid down that, after giving birth to a male child, a woman is impure for seven days (that is, she is excluded from taking part in worship), that the boy is to be circumcised on the eighth day, and that the woman must then remain at home a further thirty-three days for her blood to be purified (cf. Leviticus 12: 1– 4). After this she is to present a purification sacrifice.” [32] Therefore, “When the days were completed for their purification according to the law of Moses, they took him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord, just as it is written in the law of the Lord, ‘Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord,’ and to offer the sacrifice of ‘a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons,’ in accordance with the dictate in the law of the Lord”. (Luke 2:22-24) “Poor people need bring only two turtle-doves or two young pigeons. Mary presented the offering of the poor (cf. Luke 2: 24). Luke, whose entire Gospel is shot through with a theology of the poor and a theology of poverty, is once again making it abundantly clear that Jesus’ family belonged to the poor of Israel, and that it was among such as them that the promises would be fulfilled.” [33]

Every one of us innately longs for security; we want something or someone we can “hold on to” that will give us a sense of peace and stability. Many of us seek security in money; having enough now and for the future can give us a “sense” of security. Many of us seek security in physical or material possessions; having a nice home, abundant furnishings, and an adequate wardrobe can give us a “sense” of security. Many of seek security in people; having the right people: a strong husband, a dependable wife, or stable parents can give us a “sense” of security. However, when you are poor your only security comes from God. You are forced to depend, live vulnerable, and rely on someone else for everything. Most of us resist poverty because we fear that if we let go of providing security for ourselves God won’t come through with His end of the bargain. We resist poverty either because we are convinced the “this world” really can provide want we really want or God won’t do as good of a job as we can for ourselves.

So much of the Nativity story is influenced by poverty: the meager accommodations of the cave; the shepherds who were the first to hear the Good News; the Temple offerings in Jerusalem. God loves poverty—so much so that it was the canvas upon which He painted His birth into humanity. When Mary presented her sacrifice in the Temple she offered the sacrifice of the poor. Mary was poor. Joseph was poor. Jesus was poor. Their entire being was oriented toward God for everything. They sought security only from God. What’s more important than money or wealth or your bank account is your attitude towards it. Money isn’t the issue, our hearts are. The question we must ask is, “Where do I draw my security: from the things of this world or from God?”

It’s one thing to start a relationship with God and it’s another thing to stay in relationship with God. Most of us can admit that the challenge is staying in relationship. What I’ve learned about me is this: what “pulls me out of relationship” is me. I often walk away from God because I feel I have to do for myself, I have to provide my own security. Now of course, we have to be responsible. After all, prudence is the foundation of the Cardinal virtues. However, if we seek to provide our own security in life then we may fall into compartmentalizing our lives. Thus, I’ll trust God with “this” but I won’t trust God with “that”. Compartmentalizing will always threaten intimacy with God. Mary was poor. Joseph was poor. Jesus was poor. The entire being was oriented toward God for everything. They sought security only from God. Where are you compartmentalized? Where do you draw your security: from the things of this world or from God? What’s your attitude toward dependency? What’s your attitude towards interior poverty?

FOR YOUR PRAYER

The Psalms are the sacred music of a chosen people. The Psalms were written as songs to praise God. Imagine how Mary and Joseph would have sung the Psalms as they traveled from Bethlehem to Jerusalem for the Presentation. Begin by slowly reading Psalm 113. Now, prayerfully imagine the scene in Luke 2:22-24. Be in the scene. Be with Joseph. Be with Mary. Be with them as they walk to Jerusalem. Be with them as they enter the great Temple. Be with them as they offer sacrifice with the priests. Notice their poverty. Notice their dependency. Pay attention to where they go for security.

TODAY'S PRAYER“Father, I want to know you. I want a relationship with you. Teach me how to receive. Teach me how to be in relationship with you and how to stay in relationship with you. Teach me how to seek security only from you.”

[32] Pope Benedict XVI, Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives, pg. 81
[33] Ibid.

© Fr. Mark Toups, 2012. Expressed written permission required for duplication.