6/07/2015

Check out our new website!

It's still under construction ... but, you'll love it!

Here's a sneak peak ... due to be "fully up" by July 1, 2015!

www.ctr-htdiocese.org.

I'll start posting everything there!

Homily for June 7, 2015


4/26/2015

April 26: Teach Us to Pray: Part 2

MASS READINGS  4th Sunday of Easter
•  All the readings together

LORD, TEACH US HOW TO PRAY l PART 2
Sunday, April 26


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•   Click here to listen on YouTube

MISSED THE HOMILY FROM WEEK 1?

•   Click here to listen on to week no. 1: Sunday, April 19

TODAY'S NOTES

No. 1
Lectio Divina is Latin for “divine reading.”

No. 2
“One of the most beautiful ways to enter into prayer passes through the Word of God. Lectio Divina introduces us to direct conversation with the Lord and opens the treasures of wisdom. Intimate friendship with Him, who loves us and renders us capable of seeing with the eyes of God, of speaking with His Word in our heart, of preserving the beauty of this experience and of sharing it with those who are hungry for eternity.”
— Pope Francis, Message to the Prior General of the Carmelite Order

No. 3: Today's Responsorial Psalm

R. (22) The stone rejected by the builders has become the cornerstone.

Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good, for his mercy endures forever. It is better to take refuge in the LORD than to trust in man. It is better to take refuge in the LORD than to trust in princes.

R. The stone rejected by the builders has become the cornerstone.

I will give thanks to you, for you have answered me and have been my savior. The stone which the builders rejected has become the cornerstone. By the LORD has this been done; it is wonderful in our eyes.

R. The stone rejected by the builders has become the cornerstone.

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD; we bless you from the house of the LORD. I will give thanks to you, for you have answered me and have been my savior. Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; for his kindness endures forever.

R. The stone rejected by the builders has become the cornerstone.

— Psalm 118:1, 8-9, 21-23, 26, 28, 29

No. 4: Step One: Lectio
Slowly read the passage ... very slowly ... pay attention to which words "speak to you"

No. 5: Step Two: Meditatio
Think ... what's the passage saying to you ... how does the passage connect to your life?

No. 6
'In the presence of God, during a recollected reading of the text, it is good to ask, for example: 'Lord, what does this text say to me? What is it about my life that you want to change by this text? What troubles me about this text? Why am I not interested in this?' Or perhaps: 'What do I find pleasant in this text? What is it about this word that moves me? What attracts me? Why does it attract me?'"
— Pope Francis, Evangelii Gaudium no. 153

No. 7: Step Three: Oratio
Talk to God

No. 8: Step Four: Comtemplatio
Resting in God’s presence

HUNGRY FOR MORE?

•   Click here to for 7 questions about prayer
•   Click here to for Oremus

4/24/2015

April 19: Teach Us to Pray: Part 1

MASS READINGS  4th Sunday of Easter
•  All the readings together

LORD, TEACH US HOW TO PRAY l PART 1
Sunday, April 19


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•   Click here to listen on YouTube

NOTES

Today’s Responsorial Psalm

"When I call, answer me, O my just God, you who relieve me when I am in distress; have pity on me, and hear my prayer!"
— Psalm 4:2

"As soon as I lie down, I fall peacefully asleep, for you alone, O LORD, bring security to my dwelling."
— Psalm 4:9

No. 1
“The desire for God is written in the human heart, because man is created by God and for God; and God never ceases to draw man to himself. Only in God will he find the truth and happiness he never stops searching for.”
Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 27

No. 2
“Are we often weary, disheartened, and sad? Do we feel weighed down … Do we think that we won’t be able to cope? Let us not close our hearts, let us not lose confidence, let us never give up.”
― Pope Francis, The Church of Mercy

No. 3
“Many Christians are aware of the necessity and the beauty of contemplative prayer and have a sincere yearning for it. Yet, apart from tentative efforts soon abandoned, few remain faithful to this mode of prayer, and even fewer are really convinced and satisfied by their own practice of it. ... We would like to pray, but we cannot manage it. … Our time of prayer passes leaving us distracted, and since it does not seem to yield any tangible fruit, we are tempted to give up.  From time to time we take up a book on ‘meditations’ which presents us, ready-made contemplations we ought to produce ourselves. ... Often fear robs us of the confidence to take steps on our own.”
— Hans Urs von Balthasar, Prayer

No. 4
“He was praying in a certain place, and when he ceased, one of his disciples said to him, ‘Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.’”
— Luke 11:1

No. 5
“God calls man first. Man may forget his Creator or hide far from his face; he may run after idols or accuse God of having abandoned him; yet the living and true God tirelessly calls each person to that  mysterious encounter known as prayer. In prayer, God’s initiative of love always comes first; our own first step is always a response.”
Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 2567

No. 6
“Where does prayer come from? Whether prayer is expressed in words or gestures, it is the whole man who prays. But in naming the source of prayer, Scripture speaks sometimes of the soul or the spirit, but most often of the heart (more than a thousand times). According to Scripture, it is the heart that prays. If our heart is far from God, the words of prayer are in vain.”
Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 2562

No. 7
Prayer is responding to God and relating to Him from the truth of our heart.

HUNGRY FOR MORE?

•   Click here to for 7 questions about prayer
•   Click here to for Oremus